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Mike Ilitch School of Business adds modernist splash to Woodward Avenue

Wayne State University cut the ribbon Tuesday on its new Mike Ilitch School of Business, the latest addition to downtown Detroit's growing list of attractions. The new school is many things at once: First, it delivers a shot of modernism to Woodward Avenue's mostly traditional architectural environment. Next, the school also fronts directly on Woodward Avenue, vying to become not an isolated ivy-covered building tucked away on a campus, but an open, welcoming addition to the streetscape. WSU President M. Roy Wilson said he and Christopher Ilitch spent a lot of time with architects at SmithGroup trying to design a school that was open and welcoming, with  the many formal and informal gathering places, including the Terrace and an outside lawn suitable for tented events, as a result.
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$59 million Wayne State business school opens with nod to Ilitch legacy

When Wayne State University students start classes next week at the new Mike Ilitch School of Business, they'll enjoy classrooms with views of downtown Detroit's skyline and state-of-the-art facilities in a sleek 125,000-square-foot building on Woodward Avenue. The Ilitch family starred in a ribbon-cutting ceremony Tuesday for its patriarch's namesake business school, 2 1/2 years after the largest donation in Wayne State University history jump-started its construction.
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New Mike Ilitch School of Business opens in downtown Detroit

The new Mike Ilitch School of Business has opened Tuesday in downtown Detroit. A new addition to Wayne State University's campus, the development was made possible thanks to $40 million donation from Mike and Marian Ilitch. "Mike and I were so proud to make the gift to build this school, it was one of the highlights of our careers," said Little Caesars co-founder Marian Ilitch. "We were so excited about the positive impact it will have on the students, the university, the city of Detroit and our broader community, for generations to come."
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Detroit woman builds village for neighborhood

"This is a part of Wayne State Medical School's social mission," said Dr. Jennifer Mendez, the medical school's director of co-curricular programs and assistant professor of internal medicine. "It is a way for our students to apply their classroom knowledge to real-life situations." The Wayne State students also formed an organization to support Auntie Na's this year after being inspired during volunteer efforts during the last school year. It includes about 20 members.
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Detroit real estate game creates chaos in neighborhoods

Land contracts are a popular home buying tool in Detroit where mortgages have historically been hard to come by — have little protections for buyers. "Land contracts can be so pernicious there is no filing requirement, there is just no regulation on them," explained Peter Hammer, director of the Damon J. Keith Center for Civil Rights at Wayne State University Law School. "They can just exist in this completely private space, and almost no accountability for them." 
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Women's March inspires Rosie the Riveter book for young readers

Five women are standing together in the drawing, each wearing factory coveralls, each with bright scarves tied around their heads, each raising their right arms and flexing their biceps. They are all Rosies, "a group of women defined not by the identity of a single riveter in a single factory, but by the collective might of hundreds of thousands of women whose labors helped save the world," explains the introduction to "Rosie, a Detroit Herstory." The Wayne State University Press book, which officially arrives Monday, is special in several ways, starting with the fact that it was created by two Detroit women: author Bailey Sisoy Isgro and illustrator Nicole Lapointe, whose friendship just happened to begin through a Rosie-themed trivia question.
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Making a model of Math Corps

Math Corps, founded in 1991, is a combined academic and mentoring program for Detroit public school students in grades 6-12. It features a summer camp, year-round Saturday programs, and enrichment courses for elementary school children. In addition to math, it also focuses on life skills, said Executive Director Steven Kahn. WSU Math Corps, which is attracting national and international attention, is spinning off from the university as it begins to expand to new sites. The program is heading into DPS middle schools in the coming academic year through a new pilot with the district, other states with a $3 million National Sciences Foundation grant and possibly the West African countries of Ghana and Nigeria, which have been benchmarking it. It's a story not often told: a Detroit nonprofit exporting an impactful program. But the program hasn't spread in Detroit beyond the approximately 3,000 students who've come through over its 26-year-history.
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Actor Hill Harper partners with Wayne State, others for youth program

Actor Hill Harper is deepening his connections to Detroit by establishing a new youth empowerment program in partnership with Wayne State University and local companies. Harper, who stars in the CBS drama "CSI:NY," is launching the Summer Empowerment Academy at the Detroit university. It is a weeklong mentorship program for incoming ninth-grade students in the city. Wayne State representatives and alumni are scheduled to host workshops on the college planning and admissions process, while entrepreneurs and employees from Microsoft and TechTown Detroit will also speak to the kids about technology careers. Tours of Quicken Loans and the Motown Museum are also planned.
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Overhydrating presents health hazards for young football players

With August football practice fast approaching, every coach’s favorite cheer will be to “stay hydrated” and “keep urine clear” during the summer heat. In 2017, a University of Texas football coach created a urine-based “Longhorn Football Hydration Chart,” which labeled players with yellow urine as “selfish teammates” and those with brown urine as “bad guys.” This “hydration shaming” practice has permeated high school sports, thereby encouraging a sporting culture which equates superior performance with superior hydration.