In the news

MTU's Guisfredi earns GLIAC post-grad scholarship

Wayne State University baseball player Michael Wiseman is a recipient of the 2011 Great Lakes Intercollegiate Athletic Conference (GLIAC) Postgraduate Scholarship. The honor, which awards each recipient $5,000 in aid to the graduate school of their choice, was voted on by the Faculty Athletic Representatives of the GLIAC member institutions. Wiseman led Wayne State with a .368 batting average (ninth in GLIAC) and a career-best 71 hits to lead the conference. A 2011 GLIAC Commissioner's Award winner, Wiseman graduated from the WSU Business School this spring with a 3.55 grade point average.

Wayne and Windsor law schools team up for environmental law clinic

Wayne State University Law School and the University of Windsor Law School are collaborating to provide their students opportunities to work together in the Great Lakes Environmental Law Center. Beginning as early as this fall, students from both schools will tackle together legal issues including air and water quality, invasive species, renewable energy and environmental justice. The Great Lakes Environmental Law Center is located in TechTown. Nick Schroeck, director of the Wayne Law Environmental Law Clinic and the Great Lakes Environmental Law Center, comments in the story.
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Are American ideals a pipe dream?

Stephen Henderson spoke with Marc Kruman, director of the Center for the Study of Citizenship and history professor at Wayne State University, about the state of America today. The conversation focused on opportunity, political participation and American ideals. Regarding the role of race, Kruman said that the founding fathers would likely be surprised at the degree of racial equality in the U.S. today and that they never got far enough to conceptualize it. He added that the black vote in the south since 1965 has changed the region and that black elected officials were unthinkable before.

NMC speaker compares Iraq to Vietnam

Professor Frederic Pearson, director of CULMA's Center for Peace and Conflict Studies, recently addressed an audience of about 200 at Northwestern Michigan College in Traverse City about the chances for the democratization of Iraq. "There is some hope, if we get the right balance" of U.S. and Iraqi leaders in the security forces there, Pearson said. He added, however, that "Americans are perplexed that we're seen not as liberators but as occupiers. We're going into one of the most anti-colonial places in the world." A photo of Pearson is included.

WSU, WDET show class in support of Coleman

Columnist Karen Dumas, writing about a controversy involving WDET-FM manager Michael Coleman when he was at another station, says she is impressed that Wayne State and WDET are "standing behind Coleman. . . . More than all, we should recognize the integrity of the Wayne State University for standing behind their employee and for showing us all the importance and principles of teamwork and true leadership; a class in which we should all enroll." Dumas points out that many people jump to conclusions before they know all the facts.

Hills professor garners national award

The New York State Society of Certified Public Accountants awarded a Max Block Distinguished Article Award to Alan Reinstein, George R. Husband Professor of Accounting at Wayne State University\'s School of Business Administration. Reinstein and his co-author Avinash Arya received the award in recognition of their innovative and thought-provoking technical analysis article, "Recent Developments in Fair Value Accounting," published in The CPA Journal.

Student loan tax credit; No cuts to higher education

Legislation has been introduced in the State House that would give a five year tax credit of 50 percent for students with a student loan. The state would forgive that portion if the student agrees to stay in Michigan for 5 years. Also, key lawmakers are promising not to cut the budget for higher education. State Rep. Sam Singh, D-East Lansing, says: "We have seen the pain created by the extreme cuts that Governor Snyder made in 2011 and now it's time for us to protect those higher education institutions as we have to make cuts throughout the budget.